Meditation Tips: What to Do If You're Struggling in Your Practice | Creation Meditation

Meditation Tips: What to Do If You’re Struggling in Your Practice

There are many types of meditation; however, the one that’s encouraged in the Creation Meditation community is learning how to focus all of your attention on one object. When you’re meditating, if you’re intensely focused on one thing that object of focus can feel like it is the only thing that exists. That’s how concentrated and focused the mind can become in meditation. In fact, at some point there is an experience of union with the object on which you have your attention.

This practice of intense concentration has many physical, emotional, and psychological benefits, which might invite someone to begin a practice. In the beginning, meditation might be difficult. It might feel like a great challenge to get the mind to focus. And that’s common. However, if you can move through the initial challenges of the practice, meditation can bring beautiful inner experiences, a growing intuition, deep self-connection, and better relationships.

Even still, over time, meditation might lose its attraction. You might find it difficult to meditate or begin skipping a day or two. The following are meditation tips to assist with keeping the flame of meditation alive. They are meant to restore your relationship with this spiritual practice so that you can return to meditating on a regular and consistent schedule. When your meditation feels like it’s lost its life, these meditation tips might can likely bring vitality and energy to your practice.

1. Know why you’re meditating. One of the most common meditation tips you’ll likely hear from many meditation teachers is to connect with the reason for your meditation before you begin. Then, when it’s hard to stay with your object of focus, you’ll be more willing to meet the challenge.

2. Take a deep and slow breath before you begin. Breathing deeply can have immediate relaxation effects on the body and mind, creating a relaxed experience from the beginning.

3. Stay alert. Although you want to be relaxed enough so that the mind can stay focused and not getting carried away by one thought after another, meditation also requires alertness. Yes, it’s a practice of relaxing the mind; it requires alert attention to concentrate.

4. Read a book on meditation and mindful living. Sometimes when we read the words of others and how meditation has deeply supported their lives, it can inspire us. We may return to the practice with a new sense of vitality. Furthermore, the book you read might have other meditation tips that can deepen your practice.

5. Commit to your practice. Meditation isn’t going to be easy all the time. This is especially true if there is something in your life that is stirring up feelings, stress, or anxiety. Committing to meditate every day no matter what will carry you through those life challenges and into periods of grace, love, and bliss.

6. Have a designated place to meditate. Whatever area of the room (or entire room) you’ve dedicated to meditation, avoid doing anything else there. Don’t sleep, work, or talk on the phone in your area of meditation. Let it be a sacred place where you deeply connect with yourself.

7. Meditate in the morning. When you first get up, you’re mind is still open to the life of dreams. It’s softer, flexible, and quiet. It hasn’t yet got caught up in the chatter and busyness of life. Meditating right after waking is ideal. Of these meditation tips, you might notice that this one makes the biggest difference in restoring life to your practice.

These meditation tips are aimed to bring a sense of renewal to your practice. Meditation is a deeply powerful practice of training the mind to stay focused. It’s simplicity is part of its beauty and it’s a practice that brings incredible results.

 

If you are reading this on any blog other than Creation Meditation or via
my RSS Feed, it is stolen content without credit.
You can find me on Twitter via @Adriana_Attento
Come and visit my blog at http://CreationMeditation.com/blog